Trauma and relationships

Trauma and relationships

Trauma & its impact on relationships Is your ability to develop lasting relationships being affected by trauma? Is trauma interfering in your relationships? Unresolved trauma can have long-term effects, including having an ongoing impact on our ability to attract & retain positive, supportive relationships. Some types of trauma have particularly pernicious effects on relationships-such as experiencing or witnessing domestic violence, rape or abuse, especially if we have these experiences as a child: a life stage when we have limited experience of the world, are still developing & are likely to assume that our experiences, however traumatic, are “normal”. Growing up or living in a neglectful or dysfunctional environment can also, in itself, be traumatic & impact on our relationships. Three ways that trauma can harm relationships: 1) Stopping you from being able to form meaningful relationships 2) Leading you to become involved in abusive relationships 3) Making it difficult for you to sustain a healthy relationship long-term Common symptoms of trauma include: flashbacks, panic attacks and inappropriate anxiety. In the most extreme cases, untreated trauma develops into PTSD which can lead to a complete breakdown in normal functioning and the inability to hold down a job or maintain any sort of long-term relationship such as with relatives, friends or colleagues. Untreated trauma also sometimes results in addiction as the person “self-medicates” their pain away. Trauma & the brain The reason that trauma is so destructive can easily be understood when you understand what is happening at the level of the traumatised person’s brain. In essence part of our emotional brain (the Amygdala) acts as our security guard & has...

Free talk: How to treat anxiety, panic attacks and PTSD

Ann Marie Taylor will be giving a free talk entitled: How to treat anxiety, panic attacks, flashbacks and PTSD: the Human Givens Approach at 8pm on Tuesday 11th of October at Swann Hall, St Patrick’s Church, Greystones. Free talk: How to treat anxiety, panic attacks and PTSD: the Human Givens approach There have been huge developments over the last 15 years, in neuroscience and psychology, of the understanding of the trauma reactions, fear responses and survival mechanisms that underlie most common emotional health issues. The Human Givens Approach to psychotherapy combines knowledge and breakthroughs from these fields with the most effective techniques developed over the history of psychotherapy and coaching. It was described by the journal New Scientist as “a quiet revolution”. Human Givens Therapy offers reliable & practical help in relieving a wide range of emotional & stress-related issues. It is structured and starts from where the client is now and focuses on moving them forward, as quickly as possible, to where they want to be and how they want to live. This therapy can help people sleep well; feel calmer and be more relaxed; improve their self-esteem; Improve their relationships; reduce the amount of time spent dwelling on the past & manage stress.  ...

Rape counselling

Rape Counselling: a less painful, more effective approach. This is a link to an article I have just written for the MindFully Well website https://mindfullywell.ie/rape-counselling/ on a more effective, less painful approach to rape counselling. The alternative approach used is the same as used by a UK charity with army veterans suffering from PTSD. You can read more about it here: PTSD Resolution I have worked with many survivors, both male & female, of rape & sexual abuse & have found that the approach described in the article is very effective in reducing distress & symptoms quickly ( such as anxiety, sleeplessness, flashbacks etc.) & that it is a relatively comfortable process as the client is kept in a relaxed state throughout (using a combination of relaxation techniques). There are also different ways of achieving the same results, in cases were someone has difficulty with relaxation or visualization. In these cases I have found that it is possible to use toys to help the person stay relaxed whilst recalling what happened. This allows the amygdala and hippocampus in the person’s brain to reprocess the traumatic memories and recode them as being in the past. The memory then becomes a “normal” bad memory and the triggering that these experiences usually cause becomes much reduced or, in some cases, disappears. This is because what we call triggers are in fact sensory memories from the trauma that are trapped in the Amygdala’s Sensory Store, separate from the rest of the memory. The symptoms of anxiety, fear and panic are generated because the Amygdala uses the stored sensory memories as templates warning that...